Tuesday, 6 January 2009

Back to school ;-)


It's back to school for many, today!


Including me..here's my little schoolroom...and I'm up early, preparing my evening lessons.


Which might include..

Or...


With a little help from...


To get their imaginations working...


And if I can throw in a little bit of History..


Geography...


Nature studies...!


But most of all...


If the children in your house are back to school today, I hope the day goes well for them..!
;-)

12 comments:

Hen said...

Hello Sal,
Good luck with the teaching, looks like you have lovely things prepared for them. Harry is back today - oh deep joy, I can feel my ears recovering already!!! He, of course, is not so pleased...
Hen x

Ginny said...

My girls went back yesterday.
Wish we lived nearer as your classroom looks great and i know they would both love lessons with you.
Have a good first week back,
with love
Ginny xx

galant said...

How lovely to see my four favourite Ladybird books heading today's post! I bought a set of them a few years ago in the Dartmoor Bookshop (Ashburton) and my favourite is What to Look for in Winter. The illustrations by C F Tunnicliffe are a delight, my favourites being the cover of the Winter book, plus the glorious winter-pink sunset sky on page 29.

Looking through your school room photos, I noticed your explanation of the apostrophe rule for 'contraction' (i.e. Do Not becoming Don't). Do you explain, or ask, a child if he/she understands what is meant by 'contraction'? When I learned grammar - many decades ago - it was often the words used to explain grammar, rather than grammar itself which was my stumbling block. I think the books used in my small private primary school were those by Ronald Ridout - perhaps this name rings bells with you?

Margaret Powling

galant said...

Apologies for a second comment!
Seeing those delightful Ladybird books reminds me of another small collection of books which are firm favourites of mine. They are by John S Goodall. a watercolourist and illustrator. Many of his books were set in Edwardian England, and what I like about them is that they are without words ... the paintings tell the stories. Favourites of mine in the series are An Edwardian Christmas (which I 'read' every Christmas) and, not in the Edwardian/Victorian series (which includes An Edwardian Holiday and Victorians Abroad), The Story of an English Village, which takes a village from its beginnings in a medieval clearing through the Elizabethen period, the Civil War, right up to a late 20th century small town.

There is also The Story of a High Street, and Great Days of a Country House. Goodall also 'wrote' his autobiography in pictures: Before the War: 1908-1939. I just wondered ... might these books, which can be enjoyed by adults and children alike, be teaching aids? I'm not a teacher, have no idea what is required by the National Curriculum, but such books - without words - might give rise to discussion on history, events, nature, architecture, even numeracy as in "how many windows can you see in the house?" and so forth. But maybe I'm being simplistic and this kind of book has no place in modern education!
Margaret Powling

thriftymrs said...

Your classroom looks so lovely.

Sal said...

Thank you Galant...I always loved John S Goodall's lovely little illustrations. He did many for the Miss Read books..which I love.
I would imagine that any of his books could be put to good use with children..as I always say..all it needs is a little imagination! ;-)

Shabby Chick said...

What a nice classroom, it looks so friendly and comfy. Just reading the comments about John S Goodall, he drew one of my favourite pop up books - Lavinia's Cottage, it's lovely. I'm so glad you're teaching how to use apostrophes, misuse is my pet hate!!!

Mel x

Josie-Mary said...

Hope you had a good 1st day back. My friends little girl started today... I've been thinking of her all day.. hope she has a lovely teacher like you!! Can't believe she's started school, only seems like yesterday I was visiting her in hospital :)

cocoa and blankets said...

Hi Sal...what a lovely little school room do you teach from home??? I used to have those lady bird books when I was a child...I wonder what happened to them....the room looks lovely...I would love to come and have a lesson with you...I have been back two days and I am shattered my little frogs were very naughty today

Things Hand Made said...

Mine were grumpy as the snow arrived on the first day back at school! Happy new year

MarmaladeRose said...

Your classroom looks lovely, really cosy a very happy place. What lucky children. love Fi x

Viv Wild said...

Your school room looks so wonderful. How I wish mine could look like that.